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Haven't looked at the manual but I would suggest moving the rears straight up to the front and cross the fronts to the rears. Working in a tire shop, that is the rotation we do on trucks. Our trucks from the factory have symmetric tread design so for the best wear pattern you would want to cross them every rotation. Also, check your tires out or have the shop do it. I have found that Ram trucks with factory air suspension need alignment adjustments more frequently.
 
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I have found that Ram trucks with factory air suspension need alignment adjustments more frequently.
Interesting. I've posted several threads about how I don't think mine handles/steers well. The one and only fix done was an alignment by the dealer, which helped for about a week or two. When they looked at it again, they told me the alignment was fine.

Can you defined more frequently?

(Sorry for slightly hijack the thread).
 

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Interesting. I've posted several threads about how I don't think mine handles/steers well. The one and only fix done was an alignment by the dealer, which helped for about a week or two. When they looked at it again, they told me the alignment was fine.

Can you defined more frequently?

(Sorry for slightly hijack the thread).
Well from a tire wear perspective, all vehicles really, that have air suspension wear tires more irregularly than vehicles that do not. When a vehicle changes ride height, the suspension/steering geometry changes. When the suspension geometry, the alignment changes as well.

When you align a vehicle that has air suspension, you put it in "normal" mode. Some vehicles have a specific mode for alignment mode as does the Ram truck with air suspension. When you put the truck in "Alignment Mode" (through the EVIC suspension settings) it moves the suspension to Normal ride height and turns off the suspension so while the tech is adjusting the alignment, the truck doesn't try to self level or move around.

Since the adjust is made when the vehicle is in "Normal Ride Height" or "Alignment Mode," that's where the alignment is brought to spec. When you leave the shop and say you put it in "off road mode" or "Aero" mode, it raises/lowers bringing the vehicle out of alignment spec.

If you are having steering/handling issues, maybe try to align the vehicle based on what driving you do most (get the vehicle aligned in aero mode)

If you align the vehicle in "Normal Ride Height" mode or more specifically in "Alignment Mode" through the EVIC, than drive in any other modes, it moves out of alignment - that's just the nature of having an adjustable suspension.

You can actually see how much your suspension is off just by looking at it. When you lift the truck to off road mode and than lower it to aero mode or entry/exit mode, and you look at the front of the vehicle, you can see the angle of the tire change.

Working in the tire industry, I'm curious to see how the Rebel with the air suspension wears out tires. I know other vehicles, when customers put miles on their tires, they are always more worn on the inside even when they are good with getting regular Rotations on their tires because when their vehicle drops down, it wears more on the inside of the tires.

Sorry for the SUPER LONG response. :)
 
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