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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy all! I had a spray-in bed liner put in the truck and I was wondering how durable it will be? I have had inserts in the past, but think the spray-in liner looks much better! Never had any problems with the inserts and hope the same is true for spray-ins?
 

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My previous truck, a 2000, had a spray in bedliner that was still nearly pristine after almost 16 years. Only place the truck wasn't rusting, too. :)

Seriously, the guys at the local body shop told me that a lot of guys have their rocker panels sprayed with the textured liner when the rocker panels start to show too much rust. Pretty much stops the rusting for a while. Now I know to look for that when looking at older trucks.
 

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I agree the spray in liner looks so much better. I find myself being more careful with the spray in liner vs. the drop in liners. Spray in liners are new to me too. My experience with the drop in liner is they get holes and dents after a lot of use. Not sure what will happen to the spray in liner after it has a lot of use, and how to repair if necessary. Hopefully the factory installed one can take some abuse.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
My biggest concern is gouging. For instance if you have a load of dirt and shovel it out. Will the shovel gouge the spray-in liner if you scrape it while shoveling dirt? Perhaps I'm just being paranoid, but it just seems that the spray-in liner would be softer that a plastic insert?
 

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My biggest concern is gouging. For instance if you have a load of dirt and shovel it out. Will the shovel gouge the spray-in liner if you scrape it while shoveling dirt? Perhaps I'm just being paranoid, but it just seems that the spray-in liner would be softer that a plastic insert?
I've had spray liners(RhinoLiner) since before they came as an option. Maybe you could gouge it with a backhoe or fork truck but I doubt it and no way with a hand shovel.

Fifty years from now there will be a mountain of bedlining somewhere with only memories of the trucks they once protected.

One thing, it doesn't feel like it but it does get slippery wen wet.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I've had spray liners(RhinoLiner) since before they came as an option. Maybe you could gouge it with a backhoe or fork truck but I doubt it and no way with a hand shovel.

Fifty years from now there will be a mountain of bedlining somewhere with only memories of the trucks they once protected.

One thing, it doesn't feel like it but it does get slippery wen wet.
That's good to know. I guess I'll use it the same as I would an insert!!
 

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My biggest concern is gouging. For instance if you have a load of dirt and shovel it out. Will the shovel gouge the spray-in liner if you scrape it while shoveling dirt? Perhaps I'm just being paranoid, but it just seems that the spray-in liner would be softer that a plastic insert?
I have the spray-in bedliner and on top of that I added a Westin Bed Rug which only protects the floor of the bed. I really like the combination and expect it to keep the bed of the truck in great condition for many years to come no matter what I throw in/out of the bed.

Only time will tell if I am right though.
 

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I gouged my spray-in liner in a couple of places, usually when dragging heavy stuff across the bed, but they were surface-only gouges, never went all the way to metal. It's supposed to be easy to repair on minor gouges. Most body shops probably have a partial can of it in stock all the time and can make small patches in a very short time. Larger patches require cleaning to the metal and re-spraying the area.

Yes, it's slippery when wet, like most surfaces, but the textured surface helps with that. It's nowhere near as slippery as an unlined, painted metal bed when wet, though. And my brother's plastic drop-in liner is really slippery when wet, although that's a Ford and I don't know if it's the same composition as the FCA equivalents.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I gouged my spray-in liner in a couple of places, usually when dragging heavy stuff across the bed, but they were surface-only gouges, never went all the way to metal. It's supposed to be easy to repair on minor gouges. Most body shops probably have a partial can of it in stock all the time and can make small patches in a very short time. Larger patches require cleaning to the metal and re-spraying the area.

Yes, it's slippery when wet, like most surfaces, but the textured surface helps with that. It's nowhere near as slippery as an unlined, painted metal bed when wet, though. And my brother's plastic drop-in liner is really slippery when wet, although that's a Ford and I don't know if it's the same composition as the FCA equivalents.
Good to know about the ease of repair. I wonder if you can get the material yourself to use?
 

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Good to know about the ease of repair. I wonder if you can get the material yourself to use?
There are a number of varieties of the stuff on the market and available to you. I just know I don't do good painting. The two times I had it repaired, I talked to local shops and had one of them do it.
 

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The drop in ones leave too much room for water to get in there and then turn to ice. It's more a matter of which spray in you get instead of whether to get spray in or drop in.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
The drop in ones leave too much room for water to get in there and then turn to ice. It's more a matter of which spray in you get instead of whether to get spray in or drop in.
You are so right on this! I remember last winter hearing the ice move around under the drop in after a cold snap when the temp would rise above freezing. Surely having water trapped under the drop in would promote the formation of rust and cause problem much sooner.
 
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