Tire pressure when towing - Ram Rebel Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 06-08-2017, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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Tire pressure when towing

Getting ready to do my first travel trailer tow tires are at 50 lb. max on tire is 80 lb. thanking 65 or 70 lb should be good , travel trainer is a 25 ft. max out at 7000 lb. what do you all thank .

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post #2 of 6 Old 06-10-2017, 10:01 AM
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Just my preferences - other guys think differently:

- I have always followed Ram's recommendations and they work fine for me. Some guys want a lot more pressure, but I prefer the front wheels to be less twitchy when pulling a load. When the front's aired up higher than 55psi, it tends to steer too easily, much easier to end up straying into other lanes, etc.

- The back end of the truck is lighter than the front. With a 1/2 ton load in the bed, it doesn't even tend to compress the tires much at the recommended 50psi. Most trailers should put less weight on the tongue (back), so I have even less reason to want to air it up more. Plus the back tires tend to leave the pavement easily with road bumps and potholes. Higher pressure tires get harder, just making that even more likely, which is really bad when towing, especially on curves.

- Airing up your tires makes them harder, and less tire is touches the road. I like more rubber in contact with the road, especially when braking. But there are other reasons, too. Trailer tire failure can result in situations where you'd really want a lot more rubber on the road to stabilize the truck.

- Normally there is no difference at all for the front tires. Trailers load up the rear tires by tongue weight, which is behind the rear axle unless you're 5th-wheeling. You do get some front tire loading in hard braking, but if you're braking that hard, your bigger concern is going to be skidding. And again, more rubber = reduced chance of skidding.

There are always guys that will tell you you need more tire pressure. But these are E-rated truck tires, not passenger tires. They're already designed for heavier loads and have stiffer sidewalls than the tires Ram puts on a lot of the other 1500s.
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post #3 of 6 Old 06-12-2017, 04:36 PM
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Technically 45/55 is all you need. But I prefer 60-65psi all the way around when towing my 24' 5,500lb (dry). Less than that and it's a bit squirmy for my taste.
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post #4 of 6 Old 06-13-2017, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by johnj View Post
Just my preferences - other guys think differently:


- Airing up your tires makes them harder, and less tire is touches the road. I like more rubber in contact with the road, especially when braking. But there are other reasons, too. Trailer tire failure can result in situations where you'd really want a lot more rubber on the road to stabilize the truck.
Exactly what I was going to say. Could be very dangerous over inflating your tires. Even though your tires say max80 psi, that doesn't mean you should inflate them that hi. Tires are made for a range of different vehicles. We drive half ton pick ups. There is no need for them to be inflated higher than what is on the door jam sticker. When you over inflate your tires, your braking distance increases which is scary when towing a trailer. Also, you will accelerate uneven wear on the tread surface.
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post #5 of 6 Old 06-15-2017, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by lmeavtitn View Post
Exactly what I was going to say. Could be very dangerous over inflating your tires. Even though your tires say max80 psi, that doesn't mean you should inflate them that hi. Tires are made for a range of different vehicles. We drive half ton pick ups. There is no need for them to be inflated higher than what is on the door jam sticker. When you over inflate your tires, your braking distance increases which is scary when towing a trailer. Also, you will accelerate uneven wear on the tread surface.
Agreed.

Another thing to consider: Cold tire pressure is always lower than warm tire pressure. If you inflate to 55psi cold, then drive your truck around on a 75 degree day, you will find after about 30 minutes that your tires are now 6-15psi higher, depending on how fast you were driving and the pavement temp. All that rolling friction of the tires is converted to heat in the tire. The warming tire forces the air pressure to go up by anywhere from 10% to 30%. Basic physics. And that's on a moderate day. It can get worse on hot days or in hot climates.

If you pressurize to 70 psi, you can expect tire pressures to increase the same 01 to 30% range, to between 78 and 91psi during normal driving.

Then you're increasing the odds of a leak or blowout due to overpressurization. Tires get super hard under that kind of pressure, and then can't flex as easily. If they don't flex, they tend to puncture more easily. And bad potholes can rip them or cause blowouts. And it's harder to avoid hazards by dodging when you're towing. I've seen turtle shells tear tires apart when people hit turtles crossing the road.
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post #6 of 6 Old 06-15-2017, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
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Thank all
Did my trip with 50/55 psi and did wonderfully . thanks again for the info .

John
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